Get More Writing Jobs Through Relationship Building

  • Sumo

Whether you’re new to writing, trying to get more clients or transition back into it after a little break, you need a network of like-minded people to help boost you. Over the years I’ve made a conscious effort to get to know my editors, program managers and clients beyond the basic guidelines of the project we’re tackling together.

I stopped writing for a few months. Long story short, I tried what appeared to be a dream job (it wasn’t) and life’s path brought me full circle back to my keyboard.

I was eager to write again. But, what?

I had wrapped up most of my client contracts and was slowly fading from the content marketing scene. Thankfully, over the years I’ve worked to build relationships with my colleagues.

Now, those connections are helping me transition back into the writing career I adore.

Whether you’re new to writing, trying to get more clients or transition back into it after a little break, you need a network of like-minded people to help boost you. Over the years I’ve made a conscious effort to get to know my editors, program managers and clients beyond the basic guidelines of the project we’re tackling together.

How?

Here are a few tips you can put into place to help grow your relationships (and writing opportunities!)

  1. Connect on social media.

    Each time I meet a new source, reader, editor or person related in any capacity to my writing, I look them up on Twitter and LinkedIn. I connect. I often add a quick message about being glad to find them online or like a few of their interesting posts. This usually carries forward to additional interactions, and keeps me top-of-mind when they’re looking for a writer to work with again.

  2. Be part of a group.

    Whether it’s an old-school forum, a Facebook Group or couple of people who meet once a month for coffee, stay connected with other writers and local clients. These individuals are your rocks when you need to discuss industry topics or rave about a writing award that nobody else seems to care about. As your friendships grow, so will your desire to help each other out. When you need more work, ask the group for suggestions and you’ll likely get helpful advice.

  3. Reach out on email.

    So many writing projects are completely automated online. Assignments are created, submitted and proofed all via webforms. Take an extra moment and send an email to the team you’re working with to tell them how great the piece turned out or to get clarification during a tough patch. This additional effort makes you memorable, especially when it’s time to add more writers to a new project.

I’m happy to report that just two days into my new full-time writing schedule I’ve already signed one new contract with a lifestyle blog, have been asked to work on a special holiday project via a previous client and was approached to pitch ideas for a content marketing company’s blog that I’ve been scoping out for over a year.

All of these opportunities hinge on relationship building over the past several years. People hire people. Work on building and nurturing your connections today!

Do you need a reliable writer on your team? I collaborate with marketing and advertising agencies to create content for blog posts, web pages, social media and newsletters. Learn how I can help your clients HERE.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Comment Using Facebook

comments

2 Replies to “Get More Writing Jobs Through Relationship Building”

  1. Pingback: Get More Writing Jobs Through Relationship Building - Best Selling Book

Comments are closed.